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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
pregnancy to the public. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and to egypt. within the last 24 hours the country has seen the worst violence since president mohamed morsi was elected in june. seven people were killed and more than 600 hurt during overnight clashes in cairo outside the presidential palace. we have a report from jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: last year, they ousted a dictator. last night, they turned against one another. religious and secular egyptians fighting outside the palace of their first freely-elected president. after riot police gave up keeping the two warring sides apart. seven people were killed and hundreds were injured. both sides were armed with clubs, but eyewitnesses said the first gunfire came from president morsi's supporters. the president's opponents let off fireworks. but they say they won't back down until the president gives up sweeping new powers or resigns. this morning, the army moved in. not to mount a military coup, but to defend a president they would once have jailed f
.5%. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: george washington famously described the senate as "the saucer that cools the tea," a body designed to soothe "hot" legislation that emerged from the house of representatives. but as congressional correspondent kwame holman reports, some senators have gotten pretty steamed over a proposed change to how their chamber operates. >> holman: a sign of the holiday season-- the u.s. capitol christmas tree arrived in washington on monday. but behind the festive scene outside, there was a partisan war raging inside on the floor of the senate. the combatants-- democratic majority leader harry reid and republican minority leader mitch mcconnell. >> americans believe congress is broken. once again, the only ones who disagree are mitch mcconnell and the republican party. >> i've never said the senate's working fine. i think the senate's been disastrously run for the last two years. >> the american people know, democrats and republicans, that this place isn't working and there needs to be some changes so that we can proceed
by william. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: how tough is too tough when it comes to sports and brain injuries? it's an issue we've followed over a number of years. today there was new data to chew on. week after week the big hits keep attracting big audiences to professional and college football. but concerns over head injuries in football and other sports have also continued. the connection between repeated blows and a degenerative brain disease known as c.t.e. the latest evidence comes from a new report from boston university that's been published in the scientific journal brain. the four-year study examined brain autopsies of 85 male donors ranging from age 17 to 98 which included football players at various levels, boxers, hockey players and a group of veterans. they've found evidence of c.t.e. in 68 cases, almost all of them athletes. football players included linemen, running backs and tighteneds who had received repeated hits throughout their careers. one was the late john macky profiled with his wife sylvia in 2009 by ray suarez. >> suarez: i
: brubeck would have turned 92 tomorrow. for more on his legacy, we turn again to jeff. >> brown: and for that, we're joined by another leading figure in the world of jazz. george wein is the founder of the legendary newport jazz festival and the new orleans jazz and heritage festival. mr. wein, welcome to you. you go back a long way with dave brubeck. tell us about when you first heard his music in the early 50s. what stood out? >> dave opened in my club, storyville, 1952 i think was the year. nobody knew him. we opened, had about 20 or 30 people in the club. by the end of the week, it was full because it communicated-- people went out of the club and told everybody this fantastic music was happening. he went from right on there, the next 60 years, never lost his popularity. he was one of the most important figures of all the great figures in jazz in the 50s and latter half of the 20th century. listening to take 5 was like solving a puzzle or untying a knot because people were hearing this melody in 5-4, and they didn't know what they were hearing. once they solved it, they neve
to tax hikes of any kind. after today's party caucus, arizona congressman jeff flake, about to move to the senate, said he is withholding judgment until he sees more specifics. >> we've got to have more cuts than the president is proposing or that's been discussed here. >> woodruff: but retiring ohio congressman steve la tourette predicted that in the end most could live with higer tax rate if they are part of a broader package. >> if i had to say where most of the votes are today, most will accept an increase in tax rates but they really want a way forward on how we're going to get the rest of the government under control. >> woodruff: but the only real certainty appeared to be that lawmakers will be back in washington right after christmas if there's to be any deal before the new year's deadline. and to two reporters who've been closely watching this story. todd zwilch covers congress or pubc radio international's "thtakeawayon wnyc. and carol lee of the "wall street journal" joins us from the white house. thank you both for talking to us. carol, i'm going to start with you. from
for tonight. on wednesday, we'll have jeff's second story from athens, about how ordinary greeks are coping in tough times.on we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. i'm gwen ifill. thank you, merry christmas, and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financialor literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.ra and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation forr public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> mike: from paint to pet food, hats to barbecue. as a nation, we make millions of products every year. but have you ever wondered just how those things are made and what drives those companies? tonight in this "n.b.r." special edition "made in a
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)